Casual workers more likely to be jobless than permanent employees

casual

Casual workers more likely to be jobless than permanent employees

A new study has found that people employed in casual or part-time work are five times more likely to lose their job than their full-time counterparts. Casual workers are currently vulnerable especially because most of them are led to believe their work will lead them on to a better job.

 

The study, conducted by the TUC, found that from 20,000 casual employment workers who work for a minimum of 12 months with an organisation are more likely to become jobless than those who are in permanent employment.

 

Casual workers are more likely to suffer from anxiety because they aren’t guaranteed a sufficient amount of hours each week. Not having a fixed income will add to an individual’s anxiety because they could rely on their income to pay for their rent and support their livelihoods. This leaves the workers in a vulnerable position.

 

Employers can get rid of people working under zero-hour contracts creating fear for the workers. One day they could turn up to work and be told they are not wanted anymore. This creates job insecurity for the individual. Casual workers also fear that refusing several shifts will make the employer think they are not interested or reliable enough to work for their company.

 

TUC also conducted a poll which found that just under three-quarters of zero-hour contract workers are offered work with less than 24 hour’s notice. This puts the worker in a difficult position because they aren’t given enough time to rearrange their commitments. TUC also conducted a poll which found that just under three-quarters of zero-hour contract workers are offered work with less than 24 hour’s notice.

 

Some workers choose casual roles because of the flexibility it brings to their working arrangements. This is beneficial to new mothers because they don’t have to work set hours and they’re given the opportunity to work without giving up other commitments. Casual roles are also popular with university and college students who are looking to earn money during their studies.

 

Frances Grady, the TUC general secretary, stated: “People are often told that casual contracts are a stepping stone to find better work. But, for many, this isn’t the case. Instead of improving their career prospects, lots of casual workers find themselves dropping out of work altogether or they’re at the mercy of bad bosses who treat them as disposable labour”.

 

Employers often argue that they need flexible workers to meet short surges of demand. However, it is clear that employers are using zero-hour contracts for a long-term strategy instead.

 

If you need any advice or have any questions regarding this blog post, please contact a member of the HPC team:

 

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